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Modern Hire Project Management Director Publishes Article in Journal of Vocational Behavior

Erin Iafelice

Modern Hire’s Project Management Director, Mike Reeves, was recently published in the Journal of Vocational Behavior (Volume 129, September 2021, 103616). 

In the research titled “Beware the young doctor and the old barber”: Development and validation of a job age-type spectrum,” Reeves and his co-authors examine the age-related stereotypes of jobs, the characteristics of age-stereotyped jobs, and the consequences of occupying them by taking a worker-centric approach with evidence based on the experiences of working individuals.

The piece empirically delineates a spectrum of job age-type for 160 different jobs and reconciles multiple theories regarding the confluence of age and the work context.

For the full paper, click here. The abstract of the research is below.

Abstract:

“Taking a worker-centric approach, with evidence based on the experiences of working individuals, the current study examines the age-related stereotypes of jobs, the characteristics of age-stereotyped jobs, and the consequences of occupying them. In Study 1, we utilize samples of working adults from the US, Turkey, and Malaysia to establish validation evidence for a spectrum of 160 jobs (= 123 raters per job). Study 1 findings indicate that entry-level jobs and jobs requiring manual labor or the use of technology are younger-typed, whereas senior level jobs and jobs requiring large investments in training or education are older-typed. The age-typing of jobs was found to be similar across countries for the vast majority of jobs. We then provide criterion validity evidence in Study 2, by testing the interactive effects of chronological age, job age-type, and sex on psychological age and perceived age and sex discrimination across samples of workers from these same three countries (= 1469). Results upheld theoretical predictions based upon career timetables theory, prototype matching theory, and intersectional salience of ageism theory. The interactive effects of chronological age and job age-type were stronger for women than for men; the hypothesized patterns of effects were overall consistent for women but not for men.”